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#176395
Anonymous
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@Ruth Grant  just to piggy back on Coach Rogers and give you another idea for a drill to work on close-outs but also any other aspects of the game you would like to make a focus. We do a drill we simply call “Close-Outs”, we usually start with a player on each wing and two lines under the basket, one on each lane line.

The basis of this drill/small sided game depending on how you us it. Get a defensive stop(rebound, steal, take a charge etc..) and you get to go to offense. Offense scores or gets fouled they stay on offense and the defender goes to the back of the opposite line. 

We start out 1 on 1, a coach under the basket (usually me) rolls the ball out to a wing player. Offense can not go until the ball gets to them, defense closes out on the roll and can not touch the ball until the offensive player does. I vary the speeds of the roll as well as I move the offensive player with where I roll the ball, I can see how the defender adjust their angle on their close-out to maintain our defensive concepts and goals. I usually limit the offense to three dribbles unless they get an offensive rebound. The dribble limit is two fold the offensive player must use the dribble as a weapon and that is longest amount of dribbles in a normal situation we expect the on the ball defender to guard before a help side defender is involved.

Once one side goes coach gets the ball gives praise, instruction etc… and the other side goes. Lots of closeout reps in a short time. 

We play 1v1, 2v2, 3v3, 4v4, 5vs5, working our defensive and offensive concepts and rules. This drill allows to work on help side close-outs and getting to where they need to be. 

I have found over the course of my career that my players really enjoy this, they are playing basketball and competing. Nothing revolutionary here but just a different way of working on close-outs. But also much more then close-outs, and you are indirectly making defense important because if they do not get a stop they do not get to go on offense. Not to mention the competition factor.

I hope this gives you a nugget or two you can incorporate