New topic

Home Forums Topics Player Development Favorite competitive shooting drills

Favorite competitive shooting drills

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #175643
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Coaches,

    Would love to know what your favorite competitive shooting drills are ?

    Here are 2 that my players really enjoy

    1. Baseball Shooting 

    Players shoot on 9 spots (innings) 4 on each side and 1 spot in the middle so they go aroung the 3pts line

    For each spot: Miss = 1 out, Make (ball touched rim) = 1 base hit, Swish = home run. Every time a runner comes to home plate shooter gets a point
    After 3 outs, shooter goes to the next spot until he completes all 9.

    Players compete for score on this drill 

    2. 3,2,1 shooting

    There are 3 stages to this drill, for each of them, shooter must complete all 5 spots (corners, wings and top)

    3 phase: Player must make 3 at each spot

    2 phase: Player must make 2 in a row at each spot

    1 phase: Player must make all 5 shots in a row (1 from each spot)

    Players compete for time on this drill

    #175898
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    On practice days between games, when I want to keep it physically light, my boys love Freeze Out, a simple FT game.

    Everyone on the lane lines and one FT shooter.

    Drop a ball bag, training spot, or anything else big on the wing spot. That’s “The Cooler.”

    Player take turns shooting FTs. If they make, everyone rotates (shooter to left lane line, bottom guy on left to the bottom of right, top of right to shooter), and next player shoots.

    If you miss, you go to “Da Coolah!!!!” to await your fate. If the next shooter makes, you’re out. If he misses, he goes to Da Coolah and you return to the game.

    I make it fun by making a big deal out of calling “To Da Coolah!!” and “Yer OTTA here!” I also heckle a little, tease seniors losing to sophomores, etc. Anything to keep it light. I also enforce precision by calling a violation for anyone with as much as a toe on the lane line or the baseline (where you must stand if you are out). Shooter’s shot (make or miss) does not count when there is a violation.

    I know this sounds simple and dumb, but my kids can’t get enough of it.

    #175907
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    good stuff @Nelson Handel and @Hugo Boisvert

    Any shooting drills with time and score are huge wins… Adds pressure and competitiveness that regular shooting drills lack.

    52 = 5 spots, 4 shot per spot, 2 free throws at the end – 1st shot= catch and shoot 3pt    2nd shot=shot fake, 1 dribble Right PU (pull-up) MR (Mid range) jumper    3rd shot= Shot fake, 1 dribble L PU MR     4th shot= either catch shoot 3 or jab step 3, no dribble  

    3pter= worth 3pts

    2pter= worth 2pts

    Each spot = 10 possible points

    FTs at end = 1 pt each

    Find out what a good time is for your age and stage is, and put a time on it

     

    #175918
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Good stuff fellas! Thanks for sharing. Our shooting drills are based off team goals. We do a skip pass shooting drill for 8 minutes. Our goal is 140+. We also do Maryland shooting which is another team goal and we busted 190 the other day, i it is also an 8 minute drill.  

     

    #175923
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    There is a drill I saw on a Key5 video somewhere (and I can’t seem to find it now..) called ‘3for’ where you do a 3-ring ladder from each of the 5 spots (corners, wing, top). from the closest rung on the ladder you must go 3for3, then take a few steps back and go 3 for 4, then a few more back and go 3 for 5. if you go 2 for 5, you restart that rung. we put a timer up and have our varsity girls do it in less than 3 minutes. most make it by the last few seconds. encourages good passes (they partner shoot so they get a rebounder and partner A goes for 3 minutes while partner B rebounds and gets them a good pass). They like trying to beat their scores. 

    #175929
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    On 1/30/2020 at 10:45 AM, Kelli Josephsen said:

    There is a drill I saw on a Key5 video somewhere (and I can’t seem to find it now..) called ‘3for’ where you do a 3-ring ladder from each of the 5 spots (corners, wing, top). from the closest rung on the ladder you must go 3for3, then take a few steps back and go 3 for 4, then a few more back and go 3 for 5. if you go 2 for 5, you restart that rung. we put a timer up and have our varsity girls do it in less than 3 minutes. most make it by the last few seconds. encourages good passes (they partner shoot so they get a rebounder and partner A goes for 3 minutes while partner B rebounds and gets them a good pass). They like trying to beat their scores. 

    here’s 3for https://key5coaching.pgcbasketball.com/lessons/menu-3-for-drill/

    and the other one I tried last night and the kids loved is 2 minute green light shooting , see below. 

    I adapt it and tell the kids ‘at the end of your range, you must hit 2 in a row. if you can’t that’s not your range, move in’. 

     

    #175949
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks for sharing Kelli. @Kelli Josephsen

    Dropping links and videos in here…I see you.

    Grow the game,

    Sam

     

    #175954
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    One of my favorite competitive shooting drills is a Free throw Ladder. Very similar to the shooting ladder that TJ  presented at the fall clinic in Dallas but obviously with free throws. We number the players on the team from 1 to 15 (or your bottom number ). We run this ladder all year long. To set the initial ladder, we collect data for about two weeks on individual free throw percentages.  I put the players on the ladder from the lowest percentage shooter down to the highest shooting percentage at the bottom.  I started this after my first year of coaching, I found the lesser shooters would really focus and work hard to maintain their spots or advance up the ladder. The better shooters had to maintain focus and concentrate to move up the ladder.  The by product is that everyone improved as free throw shooters.

    The Ladder can ran several different ways: 

    -We put the two competing at the same goal and they rebound for each other. We shoot 10 free throws for that spot, two and rotate, helps to make it more game like with the anticipation of free throws coming and made shots needed to stay on pace or get ahead. Most makes out of 10 gets the spot, a tie and no spots are exchanged. I still chart their free throw information. Usually we have two or three rounds, at the end of the rounds we celebrate who is at the top of the free throw ladder

    -The basic way is that the person at the bottom can challenge someone no more then two spots above them. 

    ex. 12 can challenge spots 11 or 10. 12 wins gets that spot. If 12 challenges 10, 11 has to challenge 9 because they can only challenge two spots above them. Depending on numbers one might have to say odd spots can challenge today or even spots, anything to make sure every gets the opportunity to advance up the ladder.

    -To change things up after the ladder has been going for awhile;  I have had an upside down day.  12 challenges 1, 11 challenges 2, etc… or and even can only challenge an even spot or an odd can only challenge another odd spot. Anything you can think of to add variety. 

    I have found this a great way to add competition and pressure to free throw shooting. The players really enjoy and look forward to the free throw ladder.  

    #175958
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Sam Allen I love the 52 drill. We have made it a staple this year. Because we play on Tuesdays and Fridays, we do a lot of shooting on Wednesdays. It is our lightest practice of the week. We do a FT drill called “Pressure.” We usually do it in at least two groups. Everyone gets around the FT lane. First person shoots 1 FT. If they make it, the next has to make 2 in a row. You keep adding them up as long as they make them in a row. If you miss a FT, you get the designated number of points. It’s like golf, the lowest score wins.

    #175968
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Kelli Josephsen we use the same drill as a warm up for accuracy and the 2 in a row shooting from each spot for pressure and speed.  Keep up the great work coach!

     

    Chrsi

    #175980
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    On 2/6/2020 at 10:37 AM, Jason Josselet said:

    I love the 52 drill. We have made it a staple this year. Because we play on Tuesdays and Fridays, we do a lot of shooting on Wednesdays. It is our lightest practice of the week. We do a FT drill called “Pressure.” We usually do it in at least two groups. Everyone gets around the FT lane. First person shoots 1 FT. If they make it, the next has to make 2 in a row. You keep adding them up as long as they make them in a row. If you miss a FT, you get the designated number of points. It’s like golf, the lowest score wins.

    used Pressure a couple of days ago.  Kids loved it.

    #175992
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    1. We started using a “Beat the Bank” FT game this year. It’s kind of a combination FT golf and gambling!

    It’s best with partners at a basket, but can work with up to 4. Your goal is to get as low of a score as possible in the allotted time or to a score you choose.

    • Every make puts 1 point in the bank, every swish is 2. When you miss, you get however many points are in the bank. 
    • When you’re shooting, you can bet to double of the above points to either subtract from yours or add to the bank.

      • For example, if you have 4 points and there’s 4 points in the bank, you can bet that if you swish this next shot you can take those 4 points for yourself to get to zero, or you can add them to the bank to have 8 in the bank.
    • You can also shoot till you miss or choose to step off the line after a make and put pressure on the next guy. 

    Hope that makes sense. It’s fun and it puts some weight on every shot. 

    2. The other is just a regular FT golf where a make = -1, swish = -2, miss = +1. Put a time limit on it and see who has the lowest score by that time or until someone gets to +10 or something. 

    3. Competition shooting is from 6 spots (baselines, wings, elbows) in groups of 3+.

    • Your first shot is worth 2 points if you make it, zero if you miss. But you can get your own rebound and are allowed only ONE put back for 1 point (if you miss the put back, you are awarded no points, and may God have mercy on your soul). Get the ball to the next guy, repeat. First team to 20 points wins that spot, move to the next spot. 
    #176112
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    i think FT drills are boring and hard to recreate the pressure of games. Here is a game i think has worked well for us…

    with 12 players, we divided the team into two teams of 6 (and evened out the shooters by FT percentage). 

    each team starts in a line with 2 balls, each players gets 1 FT shot.

    First team to make 7-in-a-row wins. (i’d put a time limit on it to start, like 7 minutes or 7-in-a-row).

    kids liked it. forced them to hit a pressure FT. we definitely improved as the season went on in the games. we’d play it every practice, more or less.

    we either play just one game, or as many games as we can in the 7-minutes. 

    (or we’d switch to 3 teams – 4 v 4 v 4 – first team to make 5-in-a-row in 5 minutes (this one was always much easier…we’d get like 3 games in 5 minutes).

    ***don’t let them cheat the order after the first make. the goal is that EVERY player must make 1, and someone will need to make 2.

     

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Forum Statistics

Registered Users
1,707
Forums
29
Topics
182
Replies
986
Topic Tags
21