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#LockLeft

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  • #175624
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hello, just wanted to get a forum started for #LockLeft coaches to share ideas and learnings. I hope to see you on the #LockLeft webinar tonight. 

    #175796
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Great Live Learning last night @Tyler Coston!

    #175804
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hello Tyler,

    I was able to watch your Lock Left defense on replay. Truly enjoyed learning this new system and how you presented the information. I will say, that I came away confused. Could you help me? I was under the impression that the lock left was your half court defense through the whole possession. That’s how I’ve been teaching it and our team is making progress each day. I do have problems with players having straight line drives going left and we have begun working on the scram, but have not played a game in two weeks. My second area of clarification centers around the transition. The video in Key 5 Coaching shows the sniper on the right side taking away the most dangerous and your lecture had the sniper on the left side.  Do you have additional videos or material showing these changes? 

    Thank you.

    #175805
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Tyler Coston LL needs its own subforum in S&S. If not, thread will quickly become unwieldy.

    #175814
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Harvey Marable

    Great questions…I am not speaking for Tyler here in my response to your half-court vs full court question….I think it can be run to fit your coaching style and players. For example, if you only play a rotation of 7, playing half-court lock left would probably be better. I know other coaches who use some of the principles Tyler lays out but then put their own twist or touch on it to customize it to their liking.

     

    #175817
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thank you Sam. I’ll just need to continue learning about the small things to make it easier for my players. Any suggestions will help.

    #175851
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Tyler Coston thanks for the great format for learning.   I just finished watching your most recent live learning.  The new emphasis really feels like it simplifies the early stages at the very least.   Most of my questions were answered, but I did have one that you alluded to, but I would appreciate your thoughts and clarification.

    I am curious, when matching up in transition how you would handle an overload left.  Say the controller does his job, but only barely, and the ball enters half court on the left but near the mid-line.  The offense has a player on the wing, as well as a player in the corner (both left) as well.  In this case would you have the sniper play a true zone concept and “guard” both players – just adjust his gap when the ball is passed to the wing.  If so, how would you teach the closeout to the wing when that would leave no one in the gap and an open corner. 

    Or would the matchup high player move to the left side for an additional gap defender?  And if that is the case would the sniper take the wing or corner.   

    As I type out the question I find myself  leaning towards the first option.   The trick here (besides the closeout and gap coverage) would be that the controller would then be responsible to deny the wing after the pass to the corner since we are outnumbered on that side.   Perhaps even have the controller hand off the original ball handler to the matchup high defender on the pass to the wing – and double from the top and push the sniper left.   

    I believe my choice without guidance would be to have the controller responsible for an immediate jump switch to the wing on the pass with a sprint to the right ear “closeout”.   The spacing should be a bit cramped making this a manageable rotation to avoid giving up the clean 3, particularly since the controller should be expecting this pass.  It seems likely to invite/push the wing into the desired left handed drive into our sniper.   

    Huge caveat:  I begin installing next week, so my expectations are hypothetical rather than based on observation – but my understanding is that these first couple of passes, and how well we execute our defense on them, will make or break the possession.

    I’m typing as I’m thinking so please excuse the rambling.  I would love to hear thoughts on this matchup and rotation.

    #175868
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    CROSS POSTING FROM LIVE LEARNING FORUM:

    OK, here comes some heresy. I put in the LL this year based on the “old” system (old being a relative term for something so new; I mean the layer order originally posted on Key 5). I installed 1-3 and sat there a while while it took root. When competition started, I put in Post defense, and quickly thereafter, ball screen D (Down and Weak). I’m just now putting in scram, felling that they are deep enough with the habits not to use it as a bail out. Here’s the heresy: I have not taught any Transition D this year.

    I had a reason. As a positionless Read & React coach, I never know who’s going to be high when the shot goes up. So our rule is simply FT line above drops back, FT below crashes boards. When in doubt, drop.

    It hurt me a bit early, I’ll admit. early games were lost in transition against athletic running teams. I found myself reminding my controllers to pick up the ball early in the backcourt, then just telling everyone that whoever was closest to the ball on RB should pick it up and slow it or lock it, and that we would switch behind.

    Then something interesting started to happen. Opposing coaches would start yelling at their teams “they’re pressing!” But we weren’t. I never put in a press. My team was just spontaneously deciding when they wanted to pick up the ball early. Sometimes, 2 or three guys would stay up, one controlling and the others in high deny, or a sniping gap. Sometimes they all would. Sometimes, just the controller. It was completely organic, and completely unpredictable. Their growing understanding of positional team defense started to loosen them up to play opportunistically, freely, with aggression and confidence. I didn’t coach it, per se. I just let it flower. 

    We’re averaging 7.5 deflections and 13 steals a game, forcing a 26% TO%. Up from 6.6/8.5/18% last year (when i thought I had a pretty good defense). But it’s the freedom to play that excites me. It’s a system that’s making better players, not just better plays. So I’m not gonna worry about Trans D this year. “Get back and pick up ball early” seems like pretty simple coaching to me.

    Maybe I’m an idiot and will eat these words in playoffs Forgive me if I do ;-).

    #175876
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Nelson, great feedback, thanks for sharing. That is very valuable!

     

    I love how you have made it fit your offensive system and personnel. That is the sign of an adaptive coach!

    #175877
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    On 1/15/2020 at 1:36 PM, Aaron Hill said:

    @Tyler Coston thanks for the great format for learning.   I just finished watching your most recent live learning.  The new emphasis really feels like it simplifies the early stages at the very least. – (I

    Most of my questions were answered, but I did have one that you alluded to, but I would appreciate your thoughts and clarification.

    I’m so glad the adjustments to the layers provide more clarity and simplicity!

    On 1/15/2020 at 1:36 PM, Aaron Hill said:

    I am curious, when matching up in transition how you would handle an overload left.  Say the controller does his job, but only barely, and the ball enters half court on the left but near the mid-line.  The offense has a player on the wing, as well as a player in the corner (both left) as well.  In this case would you have the sniper play a true zone concept and “guard” both players – just adjust his gap when the ball is passed to the wing.  If so, how would you teach the closeout to the wing when that would leave no one in the gap and an open corner. 

    I think I am picturing this, the Safety is not gap as the Sniper closes the left Wing. 

     

    Matchup Low drops to the rim on the Wall. 

    On 1/15/2020 at 1:36 PM, Aaron Hill said:

    Or would the matchup high player move to the left side for an additional gap defender?  And if that is the case would the sniper take the wing or corner.   

    As I type out the question I find myself  leaning towards the first option.   The trick here (besides the closeout and gap coverage) would be that the controller would then be responsible to deny the wing after the pass to the corner since we are outnumbered on that side.   Perhaps even have the controller hand off the original ball handler to the matchup high defender on the pass to the wing – and double from the top and push the sniper left.   

    I believe my choice without guidance would be to have the controller responsible for an immediate jump switch to the wing on the pass with a sprint to the right ear “closeout”.   The spacing should be a bit cramped making this a manageable rotation to avoid giving up the clean 3, particularly since the controller should be expecting this pass.  It seems likely to invite/push the wing into the desired left handed drive into our sniper.   

    Huge caveat:  I begin installing next week, so my expectations are hypothetical rather than based on observation – but my understanding is that these first couple of passes, and how well we execute our defense on them, will make or break the possession.

    I’m typing as I’m thinking so please excuse the rambling.  I would love to hear thoughts on this matchup and rotation.

    This is very helpful to us all as you will find what needs to be coached and trained by what happens most in games. Your personnel, your coaching emphasis and your competition will create unique problems for your team. Each team I work with finds that. Once you get to those unique problems, you are on your way because you are controlling what you are giving up instead of the O. 

    #175878
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    On 1/10/2020 at 2:41 PM, Harvey Marable said:

    Hello Tyler,

    I was able to watch your Lock Left defense on replay. Truly enjoyed learning this new system and how you presented the information. I will say, that I came away confused. Could you help me? I was under the impression that the lock left was your half court defense through the whole possession.

     

     

    On 1/10/2020 at 2:41 PM, Harvey Marable said:

    Yes, I would suggest #LockLeft be your stock half court defense. 

     

    On 1/10/2020 at 2:41 PM, Harvey Marable said:

     

    That’s how I’ve been teaching it and our team is making progress each day. I do have problems with players having straight line drives going left and we have begun working on the scram, but have not played a game in two weeks. My second area of clarification centers around the transition. The video in Key 5 Coaching shows the sniper on the right side taking away the most dangerous and your lecture had the sniper on the left side.  Do you have additional videos or material showing these changes? 

    There are additional videos coming. I have found that if you can control the half, the vast majority of passes are going up the left side not the right. Therefore I moved the Sniper over to the left to give them less to think about in transition. 

    On 1/10/2020 at 2:41 PM, Harvey Marable said:

    Thank you.

     

    #175900
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hello Tyler and others. I would love to have input from other coaches. We have worked on putting in lock left this season. We are struggling with some different actions at times. 

    One of our struggles is getting players to buy in and go all in. Most players are trying but some have outside influences telling them that this is a junk defense and we can’t beat good teams with it. Therefore, those players aren’t giving their full effort to learn and go all in for their team. And this makes our lock left defense not work as well as it could be working. 

    Also, how long should we expect to struggle with getting good enough at the lock left to defensively compete with the great teams? And do you recommend we just stick with it until we get it? 

    Thanks!!

     

    #175901
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Tonya Schissler

    I came across the Lock Left defense about the same time I came across this quote, “teams don’t fail because they are wrong, teams fail because they don’t commit.”  So that has been my guiding principle throughout the season – no matter what, we were going to commit to the defense and give it a fair chance to develop and evaluate it.   While we have been far from perfect in our execution, the defense has been an unquestioned success for us.  We are a boys program in the 7A (largest) classification in Florida, so we play some elite level competition.  We’ve managed to win 10 games so far with a group that is clearly less athletic and less skilled than most of our competition.

    As for buy in, we showed our kids a shot chart from last year so that they could see we were losing games because we were giving up far too many right handed layups and three pointers.  Then we made the case for why this defense would solve those problems.  We had some early success and that allowed us to build some momentum.  Truth be told, we had to find a way to do something different, because lining up with traditional defensive concepts was not going to lead to success for us.  We kept emphasizing that this was “our” system, and that nobody else was doing what we were doing.  It was our secret.  The kids really bought into that.  Finally, when the opposition would make a tough, contested layup from the left side, we would tell our players, “good for them, now let’s see if they can do that 25 times a game” which they understood was a tall task.  

    I’ll go over the numbers in a second,  but first I wanted to share some of the adjustments we’ve had to make.  Early in the year we were struggling with straight line drives, even from the left side.  So we had to adjust the mid line defenders to step out a little more.  This left an open offensive player on the opposite block, which we’ve had to teach them to rotate down from the top mid line spot.  We have finally adjusted well to that and are starting to get deflections and steals on block to block passes.  Finally, our biggest struggle has been fouling.  We try too much to block shots and steal the ball on the drive.  We’re working on making them show their hands so that teams aren’t getting to the foul line against us.  The bigger point here is that if we did not commit to the defense we never would have made it far enough to figure out these adjustments.  I promise you that you can, and will, beat good teams with this defense.  

    Here is where I get excited about our defense.  Our opponent’s efg is 42.1% down from 48.6% last season.  Points per possession is down to .84 from .97.  Assists are down to 9.3 from 13.4  57% of our opponent’s shots come from the left side of the court, up from 50% last season.  I’m most proud of our three point defense.  We allow less than 4 per game, last season we gave up over 7.  And the percentages are down as well, 25.7% from 30.8%.  Finally, we are at our best in the 4th quarter, because this defense wears people down.  Their efg drops to 36.1% in the 4th while their turnover percentage is up to 23.3%.  Last year we were at 47.1% and 16.9% respectively.  And we are still learning and getting better at it!

    I apologize for the long winded post but wanted to give some honest feedback about what has worked for us.  I’d be happy to help in any way I can, please let me know if you have any other questions.  Best of luck!

    #175902
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Anthony Paradise

    Anthony – Thank you so much for your response. I very much appreciate that you were long winded. When I look at what this defense can do I am very excited about it but had just been a little discouraged with how things were going. I am thankful for your feed back and it encourages me to keep on working on it!! We will need something to push us past some other top level teams and I think this could be successful for us!!

     

    Thanks 

    tonya

     

    #175903
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    great post @Anthony Paradise. I celebrate the detail and clarity of your analysis. Let me resend along the same lines, so @Tonya Schissler has some more data.

    First, we also had early success, which helped buy-in, but struggled with many of the same problems early on. We fouled too much from being over-aggressive, so I spent time reinforcing that we were controlling SPACE, making the ball go where we wanted and then playing in gaps and passing lanes. This freed them from feeling they had to stop the ball all the time (just “lock it” left), reducing fouls. It also reduced the number of times they bit on fakes and moves to the right. We reinforced the 45-degree angle on our on-ball defense as well, both of which eventually helped us reduce exposure to straight line drives on the left.

    Then, we too had to teach the top Deny defender to drop to the level of the ball on these drives and cut off the driver to WS block pass ( @Tyler Coston, we could use a drill to teach this rotation early on). We’re now getting regular deflections on these (hard to steal as they are often deflected OB). I’m finding Scram is taking a while to sink-in, as my players don’t trust their reads about when an on-ball defender is beat.

    Overall, we have beaten several VERY good teams with this defense, and are punching above our weight. In fact, the better the team, the more frustrated they seem to get by what we are doing.

    Here are our opponents stats, lined up with @Anthony Paradise‘s, last year/this year: EFG 39.7/38.1; PPP .80/.70; PPG 55/48; 3FGA 16.4/12.1; 3FG% 23.5/17.5; TO 16.4/23.5; TO% 20/28; 3rdQTR EFG% 39.4/30.8**

    **I shared my 3rd QTR EFG because, frankly, we’re blowing out a lot of teams, and I often have subs on the floor in the 4th..

    Here’s the kicker: we played a MUCH tougher schedule this year. I scheduled only the top of our division and higher division schools, I would estimate a 8-10 pt difference on average (meaning if we gave up 55 last year, with the same defense we would have given up 63-65 pts). So far, the LL has been a success for us. But it does take patience, commitment, and training. Old habits are hard to retrain, but once they do, there’s a lot of joy in Mudville.

    Hope this contributes…

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