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#LockLeft

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  • #176253
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    In the first live session of the Lock Left course @Tyler Coston mentions a PDF. I can not find the PDF anywhere on here. Does anyone know how to get that? Thanks! 

    #176254
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Nate Wade Congratulations on your new position!!  Sounds like you have a good offensive foundation established with the members of your JV team. You also seem to have a good grasp of how your team will stack up against your competition. 

    One bit of advice I would give you is to coach what you can teach at a high level that gives your team the best chance to be successful. As we all know there are many ways to accomplish the same goal. Example a packed in man and a packed in zone can force your opponents into taking very similar shots albeit in a different way.

    Also, study everything you can about the game and reach out to successful coaches in your area and pick their brains all that you can. 

    As far as the LL defense. We installed a similar version of it but modified it more to fit our personnel and into more align with our defensive goals. We did not extend our defense much beyond half court because we were not as athletic as most of our opponents. Several of our opponents in our league had college level players and a couple signed major D1. I studied a guy in Canada named Dave Smart and took a lot of his defensive concepts into account. So our defense became a mixture of LL, Dave Smart’s Def, and pack line. As @Nelson Handel stated when you cause players; even very good players to play with their weak hand it can really mess them up and cause them issues. These concepts are easily used in zone defense as well. 

    One thing you might consider offensively is trying to run when you can to get some easy baskets and if not then really control the tempo. The hardest thing to do offensively is play 5 on 5. I have been in the same boat several times; have trouble scoring and not as athletic as the opposition. This makes your margin of error very small.     

    Good Luck

    #176276
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Nate Wade Hi Nate. We put in lock left last season and definitely had some good things happen but also had our struggles. I think this defense is definitely a very TEAM oriented defense. If you have good buy in and everyone is doing their job I definitely think that this defense could work for a team that’s not quite as athletic. It seems to me that positioning is possibly more important that athleticism (although some level of athleticism is required). If you have players that have good bball IQ and are committed to the positioning that comes with the LL then it could be successful. 

    Like people talked about above, each defense gives up something. We did give up more straight line drives. If everyone is in the positions they are supposed to be in then LL can handle this. The trouble comes when you get players either who are not fully bought in or just are having a hard time understanding the positioning. I think our problem was a little of both but going into our 2nd season of running it I am optimistic that we can really make this defense work for our team. 

    So, if you have smart & bought in players, I think this could work for your team. Good luck!

    #176280
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Tyler Coston and fellow #LL coaches,

    Just a quick LL?

    Has anyone tried marrying the TAG Up Offensive Rebounding system (Aaron Fearne) with the LL defense? My situation requires us to Be Different first before we are Better. Just thinking through if they would marry well or not. Happy to get push back. 

    Note I heard about Tag Up OR through @BballImmersion. 

    With appreciation,

    Adrian Mills

    #176286
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    On 6/8/2020 at 8:49 PM, Adrian Mills said:

    Has anyone tried marrying the TAG Up Offensive Rebounding system (Aaron Fearne) with the LL defense? My situation requires us to Be Different first before we are Better. Just thinking through if they would marry well or not.

    For anyone interested, @Mark Jarram, @Brandon Sharp and I have organized a zoom call to discuss this on Friday, 6/12. If you are interested in joining, PM me for details.

    #176678
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Tyler Coston @Nelson Handel

     

    So I have a question that is personnel related. 

    I have a senior that is roughly 6’2″ (girls bball) and has a traditional post build and has traditional post quickness.  We run Dribble Drive so she is typically in the dunkers spot.  She has a solid 6 inches on just about everyone else on the team. She does have asthma and usually has to be subbed every 2-3 minutes for a 2 minute breather. Most other players are roughly the same quickness and are capable on ball defenders.

     

    NOw that I have that out of the way here is my question (s):

     

    1.  What would you recommend her role to be in transition?  Safety or matchup low?

    2. In the latest videos you seemed to recommend a matchup style defense throughout the possession.  Would you recommend this with my personnel?  How does the defense change when committing to a match up?  I don’t have a lot of experience running a matchup so lots of detail would be great on this.

    3.  I have become familiar with tagging up but have not implemented it yet.  To be an effective tag up team do you need to have five relatively capable defenders in space?  Or could you get away running it with a traditional post as I have described?

     

    Thanks in advance.

     

     

    #176679
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Travis, I am responding just so that I can see Tyler and Nelson answer.  With her height I would want her to get back as the safety, but you also said that she has asthma and has to be subbed every 2-3 mins so I would be concerned about having her sprinting back to the safety position every time.  Part of me say use her as a soft controller since the entire team has the same speed. Maybe just have her apply soft pressure on the ball to get the ball handler to bring it up the floor on the left side.  The other part of me say put her in one of the non specialty roles and have her get back and match up with the player that she’s closes to.  Yes, I like having her match up better.  @ Tyler / Nelson your thoughts.?

    #176680
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I think questions #1 and #2 are probably best @Tyler Costonqueries. I run the LL as a M2M scheme, and while I like the idea of a match up zone, don’t know much about implementing it either. If I had to guess at the best position for the player you describe, I’d look at her in the high deny spot. A good controller should be able to minimize early passes to the right wing, and she can jog down the court with the second backcourt player in high deny. I’d want my safety back fast to wall LH drives, and keeping her high minimizes the amount of running she has to do. But that’s a guess.

    As to Q#3: tagging up requires a physical team, not afraid to bang a little. They also must be alert enough to play off the front of their feet, meaning crash their defender as the shot goes up. Speaking with @Mark Jarramabout this (he’s run it a few years), he lets his bigs maintain their RB position if they are inside their cover, and teaches them to “erase” by sealing their cover below the backboard if not. this is similar to Tyler’s approach.

    #176682
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Nelson Handelwhen you say high deny are you referring to the sniper position?  I just started running LL this past season and like the ideal of running it m2m v.s as a match up zone.  
     

    I would love to be in more LL discussion as I have falling in love with the defense.

    #176683
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    11 minutes ago, Stevie Jones said:

    @Nelson Handelwhen you say high deny are you referring to the sniper position?  I just started running LL this past season and like the ideal of running it m2m v.s as a match up zone.  
     

    I would love to be in more LL discussion as I have falling in love with the defense.

    happy to hop on a LL call anytime Stevie. email me coachhandel@gmail.com.

    What I call “high deny” is what Tyler calls “Match Up High” the defender responsible for the RS wing spot. If we’re defending correctly, that defender tracks the second player in backcourt (who often matches ball as pressure relief) as it comes up , staying in full deny to prevent pass to RH of floor, and then spends most of his/her time walled up on the midline somewhere around the FT stripe. For Travis’s situation, he’s got a player easily winded and often under the basket on O. I figured this spot would minimize running for her.

    #176684
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    On 4/12/2021 at 2:46 PM, Nelson Handel said:

    I think questions #1 and #2 are probably best @Tyler Costonqueries. I run the LL as a M2M scheme, and while I like the idea of a match up zone, don’t know much about implementing it either. If I had to guess at the best position for the player you describe, I’d look at her in the high deny spot. A good controller should be able to minimize early passes to the right wing, and she can jog down the court with the second backcourt player in high deny. I’d want my safety back fast to wall LH drives, and keeping her high minimizes the amount of running she has to do. But that’s a guess.

    As to Q#3: tagging up requires a physical team, not afraid to bang a little. They also must be alert enough to play off the front of their feet, meaning crash their defender as the shot goes up. Speaking with @Mark Jarramabout this (he’s run it a few years), he lets his bigs maintain their RB position if they are inside their cover, and teaches them to “erase” by sealing their cover below the backboard if not. this is similar to Tyler’s approach.

    Thanks Nelson and Stevie.  I agree that matchup high would reduce her running but she is pretty slow footed so I think the other team might have an easy team getting it to the right side. 

    My gut is telling me to have her crash the O boards and then transitioning to the matchup low position.  When the defense is ‘set’ and when there is an opportunity to, I would like to have her exchange spots with the safety.  She deters a lot of shots at the rim with her height and being taller I think she would make passing out of the baseline trap difficult.  My only reservation is that baseline trap would be a bit later than having my next tallest player there (about 5’10”).  Thoughts?

    #176685
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    That works. Can always switch when convenient. The baseline trap is gravy. You’ll only get a couple a game, and in the women’s game it’s probably just as effective a step closer to the block if she’s late on the trigger. 
     

    No D stops everything. the real power in the LL is disruption and discomfort. The trap—and even the scram switch—are gravy at the HS level. 

    #176689
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Nelson Handelwell said, sorry, I’m not on this forum regularly. Hit me by email if you have specific LL questions. tyle@pgcbasketball.com 

    On 4/10/2021 at 6:10 PM, Travis Klooster said:

    @Tyler Coston @Nelson Handel

     

    So I have a question that is personnel related. 

    I have a senior that is roughly 6’2″ (girls bball) and has a traditional post build and has traditional post quickness.  We run Dribble Drive so she is typically in the dunkers spot.  She has a solid 6 inches on just about everyone else on the team. She does have asthma and usually has to be subbed every 2-3 minutes for a 2 minute breather. Most other players are roughly the same quickness and are capable on ball defenders.

     

    NOw that I have that out of the way here is my question (s):

     

    1.  What would you recommend her role to be in transition?  Safety or matchup low?

    2. In the latest videos you seemed to recommend a matchup style defense throughout the possession.  Would you recommend this with my personnel?  How does the defense change when committing to a match up?  I don’t have a lot of experience running a matchup so lots of detail would be great on this.

    3.  I have become familiar with tagging up but have not implemented it yet.  To be an effective tag up team do you need to have five relatively capable defenders in space?  Or could you get away running it with a traditional post as I have described?

     

    Thanks in advance.

     

    1. In the new LL 2021 version, it makes roles easier. 

    Chaser

    Spacer

    Eraser – make her your eraser at the rim on D, also her rebounding role. 

    2. Absolutely, it’s why I went matchup as default, to put players in roles that allow them to be successful and master reads and gain relevant experience. 

    3. If you do the rebounding roles, you can assign roles according to strengths/weaknesses, tag some, drop others or tag all. 

    hit me with an email tyler@pgcbasketball.com if you want to go deeper. I’m not on this forum often. 

     

     

     

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