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Match Up Zone with Lock Left Principles

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  • #175720
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hey Key 5 Coaches

    I am seriously considering running a Match Up Zone with Lock Left principles.  I feel like it will fit my personnel.  I am interested in hearing from any coaches in the Key 5 Community who have ran this type of defense.  Tyler talked about this concept in a live learning session back in January and I began to give my players more definitive defensive roles and we began to switch everything to keep them more often in the same defensive roles.  So our Lock Left M-T-M evolved into somewhat of a Match-Up Zone.  If someone has some experience with this I am all ears. 

    #176273
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    No experience @Aaron Williams, but Tyler and I discussed this on one of the LL live learnings (probably on the site somewhere). It struck me as he moved towards a role-based defensive transition scheme that the system was morphing into a MUZ-y sort of hybrid. That might be the result of roles-base trans meeting the pack-line underpinnings of Tyler’s iteration of left-bias D, but that certainly seemed to be where it’s going. For what it’s worth, I’m not yet sold on this transition scheme. still working on it.

    You might want to look at Dave Smart’s left-bias principles. Maybe there will be something there to spark your thinking.

    all that said, I’m not sure what you gain by going MUZ. LL is great defensive scheme, with very few holes and lots of positive intangibles. I put it in this year to great success. #lockleftnation

    #176282
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Aaron Williams we are going to be doing lock left principles out of a zone due to our personnel as well. Would love to get up with you and see how you are thinking about approaching it. Looking forward to hearing back from  you!

    #176378
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Aaron Williams great topic, I have been out of pocket and not been on the website in awhile. We incorporated Dave Smart’s principles into our man defense as well as our Match-up zone. We played primarily zone this past season because of several key injuries that hurt out guard depth tremendously. I found these principles to be very effective inside our match-up. We did not force weak in a few areas of the floor because it exposed some of the creases in our match-up. We played more head up in these areas. Specifically the High Post area became exposed when the ball was on the right wing. Some of this was because of our lack of length on the part of our defenders at the point and this side of the floor.  Another adjustment we made that was purely personnel based was that we moved our pick up points of our controller/point back to about the defensive side of the tip circle. Our match-up zone looks very much like pack line and defends as one, so all these principles fit seamlessly. 

    As a side note: We played some triangle and two and tandem and three this past year as change ups. We applied these defensive rules to these defenses as well with great success. 

    #176413
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Aaron Williams @Nelson Handel @Dennis Wright @Ben Mullins

    This is my first year with LL and I’m pretty pumped about it..  but it seems like from its ‘birth’ the LL was super high pressure and forced a fast game.

    Then, when I dove in and kept trying to understand more and more about it and see how I could mold to my personnel I watched that exact same Live learning session–and Nelson I think that’s the one you were in on… for some reason I’m remembering seeing you in your car during it (one of those details that sticks out and helps me remember things I heard-HA). 

    I was intrigued and the more I kept thinking about it it seems like the MUZy style Tyler introduces there is better suited for teams that may not be able to play it as aggressively from top to bottom. Keep the LL rules–switch everything–make the opposition uncomfortable but within your means/players. Aside from the role-based rebounding from the offensive side that’s what I have garnered from it. 

    I liked the switching everything–and have toyed with it a lot during our 4 man workouts. It’s been funny to watch the guys struggle with not being able to consistently drive left and then get angry when they work so hard to get open on the back side just to have another defender switch off when they think they’ve got themselves open with a solid cut ? — they’re learning how valuable it is when an offense is playing out of frustration.

    #176448
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Matchup is how I originally stumbled across running LockLeft. We’re more in control of where our players are on the floor defensively, and we’re in more control of where our guys are on the floor defensively. I’ve found that works really well for us so that players can lock into knowing specific roles. The best nights are the ones when the other coaching staff begins to debate whether we’re in man or zone … our guys know we’re in for a great night when that happens. ?

    #176450
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Matt McLeod my subvarsity teams had that with a packline D we ran against a SUPER athletic team that couldn’t shoot. funny stuff.

    #176455
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Matt McLeodhow do you handle overloads in you LL MUZ?

     

    #176470
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Aaron Williams @Nelson Handel @Ben Mullins  @Nate Wade  @Dennis Wright

    I have been running the Lock Left for three years and have found that it can be molded to your personnel.  We switch everything similar to a Match Up zone, but at times struggled with what to do with cutters.  We ultimately went to a system that if it was a straight cut north and south we went with the cutter because of situations teams were putting us in to.  We also played around with the Defensive positioning so we had players where we wanted them.  It took awhile, but worked well.  This year we are going to the Tag Up system of Offensive rebounding/defensive transitioning.  We are looking at whoever is on the ball is the controller.  Players guarding the “swoopers” are the snipers and so forth.  We start Monday so it will be interesting.  Last thought, we also help from the back side and sit a defender on the Left Block pretty much to deter the driver from the left slot when teams are in the 5 out. This allows us to still be aggressive but have some help at the rim.  We aren’t as athletic as a lot of the teams we play so we had to make some adjustments.  Would love for feedback and thoughts.

    #176480
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @David Klyninteresting thought about Low D on left block. I presume you mean when guarding WS post. Last year, I had that low post D on the midline, and rotating to “heels on the lane line” on the drive from the wing. High WS D would then drop to cut off pass to WS post or baseline drift. But the low post was often late walling out of the lane. I suppose my question would be, if I shift the Low WS post D to the LBlock, will that invite the drive-and-dish to the low post? And if so, would my High WS D rotation be sufficient to cut that off?

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