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Practice Plans…

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  • #175741
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Guys, 

    I’m really diving into the Practice Plan stuff from the intensive with @TJ Rosenethis past summer….. and I’m just wondering about something from a few other coaches in different programs that I’ve had discussions with.

    Some programs (seems like a 50/50 split) give their sub varsity coaches the practice plans for each day, and other coaches do not do anything at all like that… and then there are other programs who give their sub varsity coaches a “blueprint” in terms of how to schedule time and what amount to allocate to different aspects… and then let the specific team coach decide what they’ll work on within those parameters.

    1.  What are your thoughts/experience with this?
    2. What do you think is the most successful?
    3. What if I have one coach who is more adept in terms of planning and another who is lacking? Should I change up the expectations/scaffolds for each, or would this make it seem like I’m playing a favorite or stifling someone’s creativity? 

    THANK YOU ALL FOR THE ASSIST!

    #176460
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I am a believer in, “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime,” Lao Tzy. 

    Just as we are providing an environment for our students to grow as players and people, I want to provide an environment for my coaches to grow and thrive, and I want to grow as well. Therefore, I don’t script my sub-varsity coaches practices. We are constantly discussing our philosophy, offense, defense, players, gym time, etc… We are sharing best practices and what worked and didn’t work. I will definitely jump in and help build good practices, give suggestions, or listen to concerns. I just don’t believe I have the “right” answer or way of doing things. We are just working together to get better.

    Our players change so much from year to year in regards to skill, maturity, and any other number of ways, that no plan is always right anyway. I couldn’t even sustain doing that for 3 other coaches, let alone want to. It also allows for more trial and error. Too many new companies and great minds are affirming the power in taking big risks, failing fast, and growing from mistakes to not allow those things to happen in our programs!

     

    Ben

     

    #176461
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    20 hours ago, Benjamin Eldridge said:

     

    Thanks @Benjamin Eldridge for the feedback–this is my first year leading other coaches as a varsity coach, so I’m trying to make sure I listen to wisdom and constantly change methods to make sure I’m reaching my guys—-thank you for not letting me forget that. 

    #176468
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Nate Wade – Great question. It reminds me of Sam’s full timeout video coming out in this week’s High5 – lead your leaders and sometimes our fellow coaches get missed. As a coach, I love autonomy and the opportunity to be creative and experiment, but it’s also important to receive feedback and make sure I’m moving in the right direction. For most people, that autonomy and decision-making tends to be more motivating as well.

    Depending on your coaches and their individual motivations and aspirations along with your expectations and time constraints. If you had a coach that was a big help, but appreciated a practice outline and because they didn’t have as much time to plan or the desire you could take an individualized approach there.

    I would try to do 3 things:
    1. Meet them where they’re at
    2. Provide feedback and have meaningful discussions on practice goals and outlines
    3. Check in with your coaches throughout the season on this process

    #176469
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    19 minutes ago, Lisa O’Meara said:

    @Nate Wade – Great question. It reminds me of Sam’s full timeout video coming out in this week’s High5 – lead your leaders and sometimes our fellow coaches get missed. As a coach, I love autonomy and the opportunity to be creative and experiment, but it’s also important to receive feedback and make sure I’m moving in the right direction. For most people, that autonomy and decision-making tends to be more motivating as well.

    Depending on your coaches and their individual motivations and aspirations along with your expectations and time constraints. If you had a coach that was a big help, but appreciated a practice outline and because they didn’t have as much time to plan or the desire you could take an individualized approach there.

    I would try to do 3 things:
    1. Meet them where they’re at
    2. Provide feedback and have meaningful discussions on practice goals and outlines
    3. Check in with your coaches throughout the season on this process

    Right on the money.

    Thank you for the feedback!  

     

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